Common Squash Injuries

 

This article has been written by Sally Ann Quirke – a Chartered Physiotherapist.
Find more detailed information on sports injury prevention and management at www.managebackpain.com


Squash injuries are quite different to the other sports injuries that I see on a daily basis in my physiotherapy practice. Commonly, squash injuries result both from the intensity of the twist and the repetition of the twist of your spine involved in squash. In simple words if your spine is stiff in the twist, or your arm or leg is stiff the force of the squash stroke – this can often result in strain to the stiffened area. The end result is injury.

The most common injuries that I see are:-

  1. Mid-back strain: This usually occurs as a result of the forceful twist involved in the squash stroke. If you are stiff or have not warmed up well then your mid back is at a greater risk of being strained. The mid back pain you experience can be as a result of a joint, ligament, disc or muscle strain. It is usually severe and sudden in onset.

    The treatment for mid back strain involves removing the cause firstly. Then, physiotherapy will help resolve the inflammation and movement dysfunction associated with your injury. Finally, strength exercises will help prevent your injury from occurring again.

  2. Shoulder strain: Which usually occurs from over-straining your shoulder during your squash stroke. Again, if you do not have the flexibility or strength required for the stroke, injury to your shoulder may occur.

    Prevention of shoulder injuries is very important in squash. This involves simple postural and strength exercises to help prepare your shoulder for the squash stroke. Seek physiotherapy advice for the prevention and treatment of squash related injuries. A few simple daily exercises may save you from months of injury and no play!

  3. Calf strain. This usually results from sudden force on the calf from an awkward, or inefficient, squash stroke. It can also occur due to a lack of warm up before play! It feels like someone has hit you with a racquet in the leg. It requires immediate ice and subsequent physiotherapy intervention.
  4. Wrist strain. Which results from poor stroke technique and weak wrist muscles. If your technique is not correct then too much stress may be placed on your wrist resulting in breakdown and injury. Learn your sport correctly from the outset and if your technique is not good seek a professional’s advice. It will be worth it in the long-term!


This article has been written by Sally Ann Quirke – a Chartered Physiotherapist.

Find more detailed information on sports injury prevention and management at www.managebackpain.com

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